MGM: Rivea Restaurant & Chef Bruno Riou

There are very few moments that a restaurant kitchen is quiet. It is a living thing that thrives on high-energy, passion, and creativity. A highly functional kitchen will feed many people delicious and memorable food every night with each plate prepared with care and love.

In the heart of Rivea Restaurant is where you will find Executive Head Chef Bruno Riou. With a decade of experience working with Alain Ducasse in London, he seized an opportunity to run is own kitchen in Las Vegas at miX and then in 2015 at Rivea restaurant.

One of the challenges a photo crew working in a kitchen is that a photo crew isn’t supposed to be in a kitchen. The space is created for the chefs to work as efficiently as possible. To successfully work with each other like well oiled machines is a requirement for a kitchen and photo team alike. With that in mind we danced about the stainless steel maze photographing Bruno at work.

But what is better with a meal than a perfect pair glass of wine. Somellier Matthew George manages one of the largest wine cellars in Las Vegas that consists of 8500 bottles of 1700 different label selections.

Same as the kitchen, a wine cellar is not meant for a photo crew. There was once again a need for creative collaboration to capture the grandness of the space.

With a few climbing of ladders and Chris wedging himself in an automated sliding door. At the end of the day, we made beautiful photos, worked with great people, and had a wonderful time in Las Vegas

Featured In: Communication Arts Photography Annual 56

crisman wild horses

Hey everyone! This years Communication Arts Photography Annual was just delivered here to our studio. We’re always excited when this issue falls on our desk – there’s always so much amazing work included. So we’re equally excited to announce that our “Wild Horses” photo was selected to be included in the Advertising section!

Com_arts_CC

 We also owe a big congrats to fellow group member, Andy Anderson, for scoring the cover this year with a beautiful shot from his book, SALT. And we can’t forget fellow shooters Richard Schultz, Hunter Freeman, and Leigh Beisch – so proud to be part of such a talent group with Heather Elder Represents.

com_arts_cover

Questions? Comments? Let us know at @crismanphoto on Instagram and /crismanphoto on Facebook.

Tech Post: Canon 5D Mark III, 5Ds, and PhaseOne IQ160 Head-to-Head

crisman_5Ds

Hi everyone!

So we just recently received a new Canon 5Ds. It’s been a long wait since we pre-ordered, but it’s finally here so we decided to see how it looked side by side with our trusty 5D Mark III and our somewhat finicky IQ 160 Phase One back. Below are some comparisons of Chris’ pearly blues from ISO ranges 100-800.

This is just our quick look at the cameras side by side to get a idea of what the new canon is all about. It’s by no means an in depth technical review… We’re not exactly the most technical photo crew on the planet and we’re not hoping to be so either.

What we’ve noticed between the cameras is that the 5Ds files have a bit more contrast than the 5D3. The 5D3 handles higher ISO’s a little better than the 5Ds but that was expected with the cramming of more pixels into the sensor. The 5Ds is very close in sharpness to the IQ160 but we feel the IQ160 beats it just barely. In terms of ISO, the IQ160 is really not great above ISO 200, and even though we rarely shoot above 800, the 5Ds will be able to cover us in that department as well as having an actually functioning auto focus system.

I’m sorry medium format cameras, but you guys just cant keep up against massive multi-point AF arrays. I can see us moving away from the IQ160 for these reasons alone, but then again it could open the door for buying an even larger medium format back in the future.

Take a look at the images below.  We’d love to hear your take on all of this as well – let us know in the comments!

-Jared

Click the images to see them at 100%.

ISO 100 test between Canon 5d Mark III, Canon 5DS, and PhaseOne IQ160.
ISO 100 test between Canon 5d Mark III, Canon 5DS, and PhaseOne IQ160.
ISO 200 test between Canon 5d Mark III, Canon 5DS, and PhaseOne IQ160.
ISO 200 test between Canon 5d Mark III, Canon 5DS, and PhaseOne IQ160.
ISO 400 test between Canon 5d Mark III, Canon 5DS, and PhaseOne IQ160.
ISO 400 test between Canon 5d Mark III, Canon 5DS, and PhaseOne IQ160.
ISO 800 test between Canon 5d Mark III, Canon 5DS, and PhaseOne IQ160.
ISO 800 test between Canon 5d Mark III, Canon 5DS, and PhaseOne IQ160.

2014 in Review – Our Best Work

chris crisman best photos 2014

We can’t believe that it’s already time to close the books on 2014. Forgive the cheesy expression, but it literally felt like only yesterday that we were gearing up for the year and jumping into our first shoots in January. In keeping with tradition from last year, we felt it was necessary to pause and take a look back through the images we’ve created this year. It’s been a tough edit – we tried to pick our top 10, but couldn’t stop there and landed at 13. We’ve made some many photos that we’re happy with and have to leave out a few that we’re not able to share quite yet. That being said, we wanted to share our favorites thus far, the best of the best.

chris crisman best photos 2014

chris crisman best photos 2014

chris crisman best photos 2014

chris crisman best photos 2014

chris crisman best photos 2014

chris crisman best photos 2014

chris crisman best photos 2014

chris crisman best photos 2014

chris crisman best photos 2014

chris crisman best photos 2014

chris crisman best photos 2014

chris crisman best photos 2014

No collection of images would be fit to show without a proper thank to you everyone involved in the process – including our wonderful clients from all over the globe, the extremely dedicated and talented crew who have helped produce these shoots, and of course our subjects themselves. Thank you, we couldn’t have done this without you.

Did we miss anything? Any of your favorites not included? Let us know your thoughts below or @crismanphoto and/crismanphoto!

Shooting for Shell V-Power & Ferrari

chris crisman shell vpower ferarri photos

There’s just a certain undeniable cool factor when it comes to working with a brand like Ferrari. Earlier this year, we were down in the great city of Atlanta working on a co-branded project with Shell V-Power Fuels and Ferrari. What’s better than pairing super-premium fuels with an internationally recognized super-car? When you add Chris and the rest of our crew in the mix to capture shots of it all going down. Keep reading for more stories and behind the scenes from our shoot…

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So you want me to talk about my Failures?

Last month Robert and I were down in Washington DC for a presentation on my career. At the end we took questions from the audience and one in particular struck me. The question was “What are your biggest mistakes or worst choices you’ve made in your career thus far?”

I’ve done a handful of talks and interviews and this was the first time a question like this has ever come up. Originally we were going to focus on a few questions from the Q&A after the presentation, but this one deserves some focus.

Going back to the question itself and to my failures, I think one of the mis-steps along the way would be when, in 2007, I made a transition from working at Wonderful Machine to being independent photographer. Before this transition I was growing my work and expanding my skills. The pictures had seen big jumps every year from 2004 to 2005 and I think I was in a really great place in 2006 to transition out of assisting and studio managing and into being an independent photographer.

Consciously though, I don’t think I realized the weight of the responsibilities in managing all aspects of my business being an independent photographer and as a result creatively I was trying to do things that were a step back – almost analog to a point. I was trying to work more minimally and had stopped thinking about photography from a progressive point of view. I had stopped pushing myself and stopped growing my skill set and in that sense I was working backwards. It took a while for me, almost until mid 2008 before I started to realize I’ve been heading in the wrong direction and not really making the next steps for my work. That was one a big one. That’s why I tend to call 2007 my “lost year.”

Another choice I made that I think may have been a mistake relates to a photo I made of Michael Vick, the Philadelphia Eagles quarterback. Soon after it was released in Philadelphia Magazine, one of the major network channels was covering a football game in Philly the next week and contacted me wanting to use that photo and talk about it during the broadcast of the Eagles game. I asked for photo credit after they said they had no money to pay for the usage, but they explained that wasn’t part of their process. Ultimately the value of national exposure with that photo verses the monetary worth of five or ten seconds of broadcast would have balanced out – in retrospect I think that’s one I should have just given away.

One more mistake I think I’ve made in my career has to do with my landscape photography. Going back to day one of Photo 101 in college, it has always been something I’ve been drawn to and interested in. When I started shooting more portraiture, I think that I abandoned the landscape work.

Jumping ahead a few years to when I was actually making money through photography and was able to travel and take trips to great places like Madrid, Barcelona, Buenos Aires, and all these beautiful places. When I would go on some of these trips – I think if I was on vacation I’d want to abandon my work. Now, I should say that it’s always nice to take a break, but this job is not always a job and if you’re in a wonderful place you need to take advantage of the opportunities in front of you, which is not what I did. On a few of those trips I didn’t even bring my camera and missed out on a few amazing opportunities. It wasn’t until 2010, coincidentally on my honeymoon, that I returned to making landscapes when I travel. I haven’t looked back since.

Speaking literally, there have been some falls in my career. In 2011 when working in Maui on the Travaasa Hana shoot, we were shooting on a pool at the base of a waterfall and I slipped and fell into the water, taking a 1Ds MK III and 24-70mm lens with me. That was certainly a mistake.

Last but not least – I don’t know if this qualifies as a mistake, but it certainly can feel like a failure in the short term. For some projects and larger advertising campaigns, we will often go to great lengths to prepare for the job. In the initial creative and bidding process we’ll go to great lengths to express our desire and drive to be part of the job. Sometimes we might spend a weeks worth of time trying to win a project – and when you know that you’re the right person for the shoot and you’re 100% engaged with the job, everything lines up and you know your numbers are fine then you don’t get the job, well it’s a big hit. Sometimes it takes a little while to shake it. When that happens though, you just have to persevere. You have to keep working and keep putting yourself out there and showing the world that next time, you’re the right guy for the job.

Featured on FotoFlock.com

“Is there something you always ask yourself or think just before you press the shutter button?

The way my mind works, I am usually thinking a few frames ahead of the actual photo I am taking. Whenever we’re shooting, I am always thinking with each frame, how can we make this picture better, how can we finish this picture, is this the best we can do?”

We’ve been featured and interviewed on Epson FotoFlock, a photo-community based in India. They’ve featured a handful of our images in their gallery and asked Chris a series of thoughtful and interesting questions. Make sure to check out the rest of their website and take a look at our interview here.

Make sure to keep an eye out on Fotoflock.com and follow them @fotoflock on twitter for more interviews and inspiring content. If we have any readers out there in India, drop us a note in the comments or let @crismanphoto know on twitter!